Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Catholic Church 6

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Purgatory, according to Catholic Church doctrine, is an intermediate state after physical death in which those destined for heaven "undergo purification, so as to achieve the holiness necessary to enter the joy of heaven". The picture depicts Heaven, Purgatory and Hell on the right; the left depicts Christians struggling, for better or worse, in this world.


Church Architecture



The Bishop's Throne



Saints





Maria Gemma Umberta Pia Galgani (March 12, 1878 – April 11, 1903) was an Italian mystic, venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. She has been called the "Daughter of Passion" because of her profound imitation of the Passion of Christ. According to a biography written by her spiritual director, Gemma began to display signs of the stigmata on June 8, 1899, at the age of twenty-one.  In early 1903, Gemma was diagnosed with tuberculosis, and thus began a long and often painful death. Gemma died in a small room across from the Giannini house on April 11, 1903—Holy Saturday. As one of the most popular saints of the Passionist Order, the devotion to Gemma Galgani is particularly strong both in Italy and Latin America.



St. Ignatius of Loyola (c. October 23, 1491 – July 31, 1556) was a Spanish knight from a local Basque noble family, hermit, priest and theologian, who founded the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and, on 19 April 1541, became its first Superior General. Ignatius emerged as a religious leader during the Counter-Reformation. Loyola's devotion to the Catholic Church was characterized by absolute obedience to the Pope. He authored the famous 'Spiritual Exercises.'



The Cave of Saint Ignatius is a sanctuary declared as a Local Cultural Heritage that includes a baroque church and a neoclassical building in Manresa (Spain), which was created to honor the place where, according to tradition, Saint Ignatius of Loyola shut himself in a cave to pray and do penance during his sojourn in the city from March 1522 to February 1523, where he wrote the Spiritual Exercises, returning from his pilgrimage to Montserrat.




Mosaics and Stained Glass Windows Before Cave of St. Ignatius



Memento Mori

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